U.S. Courts of Appeals

United States Courts

There are 13 appellate courts that sit below the U.S. Supreme Court, and they are called the U.S. Courts of Appeals. The 94 federal judicial districts are organized into 12 regional circuits, each of which has a court of appeals.  The appellate court’s task is to determine whether or not the law was applied correctly in the trial court. Appeals courts consist of three judges and do not use a jury.


A court of appeals hears challenges to district court decisions from courts located within its circuit, as well as appeals from decisions of federal administrative agencies.


First Circuit - NextGen


First Circuit - BAP - NextGen


Second Circuit - NextGen


Third Circuit - ECF


Fourth Circuit - ECF


Fifth Circuit - ECF


Sixth Circuit - NextGen


Seventh Circuit - ECF


Eighth Circuit - NextGen 


Ninth Circuit - NextGen


Ninth Circuit - BAP - NextGen

Tenth Circuit - NextGen 


Tenth Circuit - BAP - NextGen

Eleventh Circuit - ECF 

D.C. Circuit - ECF 

Federal Circuit - ECF 

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    U.S. Supreme Court The Supreme Court is the final judge in all cases involving laws of Congress, and the highest law of all — the Constitution. The Supreme Court, however, is far from all-powerful. Its power is limited by the other two branches...

  • National Courts

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    United States Courts 06/30/2017

    Judicial Panel On Multidistrict Litigati - ECF U.S. Court Of Federal Claims - ECF U.S. Court Of International Trade - ECF

  • U.S. District Courts II

    U.S. District Courts II

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Grounds for Divorce in Ohio - Sylkatis Law, LLC

A divorce in Ohio is filed when there is typically “fault” by one of the parties and party not at “fault” seeks to end the marriage. A court in Ohio may grant a divorce for the following reasons:
• Willful absence of the adverse party for one year
• Adultery
• Extreme cruelty
• Fraudulent contract
• Any gross neglect of duty
• Habitual drunkenness
• Imprisonment in a correctional institution at the time of filing the complaint
• Procurement of a divorce outside this state by the other party

Additionally, there are two “no-fault” basis for which a court may grant a divorce:
• When the parties have, without interruption for one year, lived separate and apart without cohabitation
• Incompatibility, unless denied by either party

However, whether or not the the court grants the divorce for “fault” or not, in Ohio the party not at “fault” will not get a bigger slice of the marital property.

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